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Cockpit weathering (Read 2941 times)
Ultra Hog
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Cockpit weathering
10/01/11 at 07:11:58
 
So I have come to a stop on one of my current builds. One of the reasons is cockpit weathering. Is there dirt and grime over everything? Is the seat completely worn from the parachute butt? Is the floor completely worn because the pilot grates his feet on the floor all flight long or does he have his feet on the rudder pedals? Of course length of use comes into this obviously. I'm just wondering. I've flown on some planes that were worse than I ever thought weathering could get and I've also been on some really old equipment(40+years and sitting outside the entire time) on our own farm that doesn't look like some of the armor people are creating right now that only had 3 months at most in the field. I'm really just wondering. I know it's all art and what you want to do because it's your build and you are the artist, but I want a general consensus, if you will.
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nerdling
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Re: Cockpit weathering
Reply #1 - 10/01/11 at 08:05:43
 
I usually don't do much weathering on the cockpit. I tend to just do some drybrushing with silver to bring out the highlights and give an appearance of some wear and tear. I agree with you on the armor weathering. I've seen photos of somebodies 88 gun that was just covered in rust and mud. I've seen stuff in my job with the Forest Service out in the woods for 100 years in better shape. Now I will say it is fun from time to time to dirty the heck out of a plane from time to time.
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Re: Cockpit weathering
Reply #2 - 10/01/11 at 08:43:23
 
I generally like to highlight things with a slightly lighter shade of the cockpit color, add a bit of wear and tear to "high traffic" locations, and maybe a slight wash of a light pastel for a dusty look.

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kryptosdaddy
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Re: Cockpit weathering
Reply #3 - 10/01/11 at 14:28:24
 
Elbows, knees  and feet, what do they contact? Thats a good place to start. And where is the first place a pilot puts his boot when he climbs in? The seat?
If there is a crank wheel, there should be some kinda round wear around its axis from glove friction and almost all painted parts of most real control panels I have seen have flakes missing from glove contact, even the backs of any mirrors. me thinks you can go to alot of trouble to replicate wear and end up with a cockpit that looks like a sloppy paint job trying to replicate too much wear. Conservatism may rule here.

just my 1/2 of a cent. Good luck. CR
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Lufty
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Re: Cockpit weathering
Reply #4 - 10/01/11 at 14:35:02
 
Bit dependant on scale. If its 1/72, you really arnt going to see an awfull lot. So a light drybrush of the sill edges. Id stick with a dark pin wash for the inside bits, to accentuate (OOh big word...prolly spelt wrong) all the nooks and crannies.
In 1/48th your a bit more open. Drybrush again but you could rub a pencill also round these edges to get a worn bright spot, if you get me. Worn peddles are visible in the scale too. A dark brown wash would work also.
In 1/32 or higher, general weathering wont really do as it will be a lot more visible. Try 'dotting' on a few scratches round pieces that may be rubbed with the parachute or knees etc. Try to keep dirt to a minimum as, Ive read, they were swept meticulously as harsh negative G manoevers would cause it to rise up and get everywhere. With this scale as well, you can lighten your base colour and hit a few panels to give colour variation. You could even 'Modulate' the colours by spraying a lighter version for the top of the pit grading to a deeper version in the depths.
Geez, that was a big post for me. Must be im buzzing from getting hom eearly LOL,
Hope that helped some, but hey, what do i know. You might think its all Balls  Cheesy
...Guy
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Re: Cockpit weathering
Reply #5 - 10/01/11 at 15:49:20
 
Another thing to consider, they can't go in and hose the thing down. Cockpits I've been in were fairly clean, worn but clean but these were not of the combat era. I suspect it could get nasty in there if there's short turn times after missions.

But even with that, the Mustang i'm doing of the 7th Fighter Command one of the maintenance guys wrote that they had those aircraft polished and waxed all the time because frankly, there wasn't anything else to do on Guam.  Grin

I guess it really depends on when and where

Correction: Iwo Jima insteald of Guam
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« Last Edit: 10/02/11 at 01:40:36 by N/A »  
 
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Black Sheep One
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Re: Cockpit weathering
Reply #6 - 10/01/11 at 21:37:45
 
Well, I asked my uncle (who flew T-6's in Korea) and he said most of the aircraft he flew in were filthy after a few weeks in theatre.
Mostly of mud and soil that would stick to their boots and would get all over the place.

The crews would do as much as they could to keep the office clean (mainly the IP) but if they were in heavy use, I doubt they had the time.
This was particularly true if an aircraft returned with a shot up pilot and there was blood all over the IP.

Now this was in Korea so I'm guessing WWII wasn't much different.

As for the seats, most WWII fighters (I'm told by some of the "Old Timers" at the museum) didn't have a cushion as the pilots sat on their chutes. So I guess the seats would be scratched alot along the edges from the rubbing of harnesses and metal buckles on the chutes.

Another thing to consider is exposure to the elements.
In the Pacific Theatre these aircraft sat at the ready exposed to maritime elements (salt, sun and wind) and, as they were at the ready, they sat with open canopies so if it rained (you can figure it out).

Go to a junk yard and look at old cars that have been sitting for a while.
Look at the discoloration on the dashboard caused by age and exposure.
You'll get the idea.
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Re: Cockpit weathering
Reply #7 - 10/02/11 at 10:09:55
 
This is one of those things that i think has got lost on us over the years, much like external weathering because we are sanitised by modern restorations done to the book.

This is an example of a fully "restored" hurricane cockpit
...
All very swish and and built to a standard that you might find in a modern rolls Royce.

This is the real thing
...
Much more 1940s and war time massed produced. These things had a life expectancy of 2 weeks in the summer of 1940 and simply were not built to  show std.

This is a restored Wildcat
...

and this is the real thing just as it left service
...

Its quite rare to see a aircraft as it was in service these days. The FAA corsair in the UK is one of the few and its only when you look at that you realise that most of the time we get it all quite wrong.  Wink
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Lufty
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Re: Cockpit weathering
Reply #8 - 10/02/11 at 10:50:11
 
Here is an absolutely perfect example of how dirty a wartime bird got. This P-38J was taken, In colour, in 1944,
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and a restored office,
...
...Guy
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Lufty
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Re: Cockpit weathering
Reply #9 - 10/02/11 at 11:53:24
 
heres another good example. A Fw 190 wartime cockpit,
...

and its restored counterpart,
...
...Guy
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Re: Cockpit weathering
Reply #10 - 10/02/11 at 15:47:28
 
Well done Guy  Wink my point exactly.
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Black Sheep One
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Re: Cockpit weathering
Reply #11 - 10/02/11 at 16:02:28
 
The floor on that FW looks pretty much like what I pointed out earlier.
But some of them IP's look pretty good to me!
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Lufty
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Re: Cockpit weathering
Reply #12 - 10/02/11 at 16:03:46
 
The P-38 pit is well cool. Ive never seen the canvas affair round the ip modelled before, What would that be for?
...Guy
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Re: Cockpit weathering
Reply #13 - 10/02/11 at 16:05:40
 
Lufty wrote on 10/02/11 at 16:03:46:
The P-38 pit is well cool. Ive never seen the canvas affair round the ip modelled before, What would that be for?
...Guy

That was a shade cover (or hood) for the IP on the J variant.
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Ultra Hog
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Re: Cockpit weathering
Reply #14 - 10/02/11 at 17:42:35
 
Wow. Thanks for that wealth of information guys. That is exactly what I was looking for.  Cool
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